Driplines & Special Acclamation Procedures

Acclimating fish, shrimp, urchins, and most starfish

The top of the line is held in the tank with a clothes pin.  A photo at the bottom slows the siphon line with a knot to control the drip. 

Put your creature in a 2 gallon bucket [available here $6] water included.  To release them, set the open bag in the bucket, reach down to the bottom corner of the bag and slowly pull up allowing the bag to turn upside down.  The creature  flows out of the bag and doesn’t hit the bucket.  Start with 2 to 3 drops per second until the bucket is almost full.  The dripline needs to be at the bottom to mix the water well.  If you want or need more time, pour half water out of the bucket and continue dripping

IN THE MEAN TIME, FEED YOUR FISH VERY WELL. WELL FED FISH ARE MUCH LESS AGGRESSIVE.   TURN OFF THE LIGHTS. 

There are 3 ways to put fish in your tank. [1] Use a 5-6” net.  Put the net in the bucket with your other hand help the fish into the net.  Put the net deep into your tank to release.  [2] Pour off half of the water then cup your hand to catch the fish and release.  [3] Pour water and fish into a net.  Put the net deep into your tank to release.   

IF THERE IS ANY AGGRESSION COVER THE TANK WITH A BLANKET UNTIL MORNING.

You don’t need to acclimate corals, feather dusters, koko worms crabs snails and live rock.

Using your hydrometer and test kit, compare your water to the store’s water.   – pH should be 8.3 to 8.4 ideally – Alkalinity should be “high” – Salinity 1.023 to 1.024 (be sure your hydrometer is calibrated ) Most important is that parameters are reasonably similar.  If not fix them first  

Cucumber and Sea Apples acclimation

Take a quart of water from your tank – take the cucumber or apple directly from the shipping bag and drop him in.  Wait 30 minutes then take him from the bucket directly into your tank.  More then 1 cucumber – acclimate each separately. Add to tank separately 15 minutes apart  Toss the water.

When any type of stress affects these types of animals, they release a “scent” to signal others.  This triggers a chain reaction.  Cucumbers expel their guts.  Acclamation this way keeps the initial scent out of the tank

Rays and Linkia starfish

 when you have a sump Put your starfish with shipping water in the bag into a container that fits inside your sump.  Start a 1 drop per second drip from your tank to the bottom of the bag below.  Let drip overnight allowing water to overflow back into the sump- release into your tank from the acclamation bag. 

 when you don’t have a sump  Leave the starfish in the bag.  Find any container that closely holds the starfish, bag and water.  Put this container in an empty 5 gallon bucket   Start a 1 drop per second or 1 drop every 2 seconds with the dripline at the bottom of bag. – Very important.  You can acclimate over hours.  If time becomes a factor double or triple the drip rate after 2 hours at the initial rate.

Allow the starfish bag to overflow into the 5 gallon bucket.  Have extra saltwater available to replace the acclamation water   When there’s about 5 inches of saltwater in the bucket, take the starfish while still in the bag and let him go underwater in your tank. 

We sell chopped clams which are their favorite.  Twice a week you can bury half a cube just under the sand for them to find.  Mostly they find food in the tank.

Molting Shrimp

If they should molt in the bag, keep them in the bag to drip.  take as much time as possible with a very slow drip.  Keep the line in the bottom of the bag and let it overflow   When acclimated pour off most of the water and put the bag in your tank  Gently fill the bag with a little water and slide him out.

Feather Dusters and Koko Worms

Even though we don’t acclimate tube worms, take the time to twist them around to remove air bubbles.

PLEASE BRING A WATER SAMPLE AND YOUR HYDROMETER. WE GLADLY TEST WATER AND CALIBRATE HYDROMETERS FREE.

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