These are possible clownfish/anemone combinations.
The following indicates the most preferred anemone to least preferred for each type of clownfish.

THERE IS NO GUARANTEE THEY WILL MATCH UP WITH ANY ANEMONE.

Anemones

Bubble anemone: Entacmaea quadricolor
Long tentacle anemone: Macrodactyla doreensis
Sebae anemone: Heteractis malu
Ritteri (Maroon) anemone: Heteractis magnifica
Carpet anemone: Stichodactyla gigantean
Saddle anemone: Stichodactyla haddoni

False Percula Clown: Amphiprion ocellaris

Carpet anemone
Ritteri anemone
Saddle anemone
Bubble anemone

Percula Clown: Amphiprion percula

Carpet anemone
Ritteri anemone
Saddle anemone
Bubble anemone

“Sebae” or Clarkii Clown: Amphiprion clarkii

Sebae anemone
Long Tentacle anemone
Ritteri anemone
Carpet anemone
Saddle anemone
Bubble anemone

Tomato Clown: Amphiprion frenatus

Bubble anemone
Long Tentacle anemone
Sebae anemone

You can positively ID a tomato over a cinnamon by looking at it’s pectoral (front, the one it uses primarily besides it’s tail) fin. If there is a black line on the leading edge, it is a tomato.

Maroon Clown: Premnas biaculatus

Ritteri anemone
Bubble anemone
Long Tentacle anemone

Pink Skunk Clown: Amphiprion perideraion

Long Tentacle anemone
Sebae anemone
Ritteri anemone
Carpet anemone
Saddle anemone
Bubble anemone

In regards to the compatibility list it should be noted that captive clowns will not always take to an anemone regardless of the fact that the chosen anemone is a suitable host. It is best to try and pick a clown that is already living with an anemone otherwise it is not a sure bet that they will accept each other.

Keeping anemones is possible.

Feedings are required as often as twice a week or as little as twice a month. Anemones get approximately 80% of their nutrition from photosynthetic processes, but they do require physical feedings of shrimp, squid, brine, silversides, etc. to maintain an equalized balance with their zooxanthellae.  BRINE SHRIMP AND MYSID SHRIMP ARE BEST IN SMALL AMOUNTS.

Anemones are actually fairly complex creatures, and lighting requirements need to be met before
purchasing one. Before considering placing one in a system, it should be noted that they will limit
your choice of corals in future (should you feel you are interested in corals later on).

Anemones move on a regular basis eventually finding a semi-permanent location in the tank. But sooner or later they will wander again. This is a consideration because anemones are VERY aggressive creatures and they will try to sting a competing coral into submission.

When picking an anemone they should show immediate retraction when touched. They should be physically attached to something within the tank and have coloration within their bodies. A translucent anemone may mean that it has expelled its zooxanthellae and a starving anemone may take 3 or more months to die. Studies have shown that even naturally white colored anemones do poorly in captive systems. Any anemones purchased should be of the pink, brown, red, green variations. BEWARE THAT SOME BRILLIANT COLORS ARE FAKE. THE ANEMONE HAS BEEN DYED. This color will fade and may kill the anemone.

Much like many corals anemones will always have a period of “cleaning” for lack of a better term. During this period the anemone will retract its tentacles into itself and a small amount of waste will be expelled (usually brown in color with notable balls of matter within). This period can last 48 hours. Should the anemone be retracted for any longer a period of time then it is very likely it is dying. Remove it before it falls apart. Should an anemone get sucked into a pump or powerhead, just unplug the pump and don’t touch. If it hasn’t been damaged by the impellor it may slowly pull itself out.

If this all sounds too complicated then it is probably best not to keep anemones. However, the relationship between anemones and clownfish is remarkable and with enough diligence, healthy anemones can be maintained.

SOMETHING YOU RARELY SEE – A TRUE PERCULA IN A BUBBLE ANEMONE

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